Half-way garments are an alternative to ready-to-wear, "off-the-peg", or prêt-à-porter fashion. Half-way garments are intentionally unfinished pieces of clothing that encourages co-design between the "primary designer" of the garment, and what would usually be considered, the passive "consumer"[5]. This differs from ready-to-wear fashion, as the consumer is able to participate in the process of making and co-designing their clothing. During the Make{able} workshop, Hirscher and Niinimaki found that personal involvement in the garment-making process created a meaningful “narrative” for the user, which established a person-product attachment and increased the sentimental value of the final product.[5]

Tastes differ. And when it comes to fashion, they differ even more. However, I’ve managed to come up with a list of top 5 fashion designers that can’t leave any woman indifferent. They are adored by fashion artists and their regular customers all over the world, and their incredible, jaw-dropping collections speak for themselves. Check out the list of the most famous fashion designers of all time:


Yves Saint Laurent became popular in fashion circles due to his creativity in redesigning the clothes considered to be masculine into beautiful, feminine wardrobe for women. Perhaps, one of the most famous fashion designers in France, Yves was the first one to introduce power dressing for women in the form of “power suits” in the year 1966. He is also credited with designing the men’s smoking jacket. The most important fashion legacy which he has left behind is the “ready-to-wear” fashion clothing.
Fashion designers may work full-time for one fashion house, as 'in-house designers', which owns the designs, or they work alone or as part of a team. Freelance designers work for themselves, selling their designs to fashion houses, directly to shops, or to clothing manufacturers. The garments bear the buyer's label. Some fashion designers set up their own labels, under which their designs are marketed. Some fashion designers are self-employed and design for individual clients. Other high-end fashion designers cater to specialty stores or high-end fashion department stores. These designers create original garments, as well as those that follow established fashion trends. Most fashion designers, however, work for apparel manufacturers, creating designs of men's, women's, and children's fashions for the mass market. Large designer brands which have a 'name' as their brand such as Abercrombie & Fitch, Justice, or Juicy are likely to be designed by a team of individual designers under the direction of a design director.
He was born and brought up in Mumbai, and was studying to graduate in commerce whilst decided to alter his field and therefore applied for National-Institute-Of-Fashion-Technology New-Delhi. After graduation won the Best Student Award! Launched his label ”Manish-Arora” & started vending in India. Manish symbolized India at HongKong Fashion Week, in the year 2000 and also participated in the first Indian-Fashion-Week held in New-Delhi. In the next year he launched his other label “Fish Fry” , it was shown in six topmost Indian-cities. His future in our space stimulated line at Wills-India-Fashion-Week fascinated many international viewers, in 2007. Arora is an industrious man who’s always on the go! Because of his intellect and beautiful sense of styling, MAC has enrolled him to team up on a new project, the Raj-inspired-beauty-range. He also introduced his jewelry collection in 2012 that was much loved. He’s recognized for his eccentric amalgamation of western&Indian clothing that assemble perfectly!
Very interesting list but I am surprised that Paul Poriet is not on this list. He revolutionized and created the modern fashion industry. Although in the end he could not survive in the industry he created his impact is huge. He was the first in many areas including freeing woman from corsets, using live models, creating a signature perfume, making an entire lifestyle brand, and modern marketing.

The ethnic Indian wear isn’t only for the Indians any longer. Wear your saree with an advanced turn, and wrap it like an outfit. Hotshot those bends in the styles that are shaking the slope, or bring back the old present day style of Mumtaz. Still insufficient? Toss in a coat, a harvest top, a tube, or anything that gets your favor, set up of the exhausting old pullover, and include a radical new, particular measurement to the conventional 9 yards. Include a belt. Make a flat out combination to possess the saree-clad look this year.
Inspiration board is a references and research framework for your design. Designer collects different inspirational images, words, and objects (fabric, colour, textures,trims, paint chips, packaging, etc.) that are organize and keep at hand as a reference for starting a fashion design. It can be made in the form of a paper poster, a bulletin board, a digital graphic, or a video.
Born in Rome in 1890 to an aristocratic mother and an intellectual father, Schiaparelli soon rebelled against the conventional life of the upper classes. Her desire for exploration and experimentation landed her in hot water as a teen, when she published a book of poems with decidedly sensual overtones. Her work deeply offended her parents, who punished her by placing her in a convent. Schiaparelli was so determined to escape from the nunnery that she initiated a hunger strike which resulted in her release. By her early twenties she had fled to London, where she could live under less scrutiny. Later, during a foray in New York, she joined with artist friends and they all made their way to Paris…
"Between tonal dressing and statement knitwear, head-to-toe knits have been brought to the forefront. I appreciate the cosy yet chic approach to cold-weather dressing," says Aiken, who happens to the one of the first industry figures spotted in this trend all those months ago. "Gabriela Hearst’s knit poncho paired over a matching skirt and sweater best exemplifies this look."
In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.
As previously mentioned, punk spirit seized the London shows and definitely filtered into some during Paris. Alexander McQueen and Dior are two major luxury brands turning the rebellious signifiers of this look on their heads (studs! leather! mohair hole-y knits! plaid!), but you'll also find some homegrown talent pushing things into even wilder territory. Even if the more extreme ends of this trend aren't going to translate into the mass market, expect to see many tartan creations hitting shop floors over the coming months…

Full name is Jagsharan Jit Singh Ahluwalia. JJ Valaya needs no introduction. Another eminent name, a couturier from New-Delhi and has an incredible bridal collection and master of hand-embroideries! He originated the “House of Valaya” along with his brother TJ Singh, in 1992, a lifestyle and luxury fashion house. It has revived and redefined age! In 1994, Valaya became 1st Indian couture-label to have a SOLO SHOW in India. He’s celebrated world-wide in London, Dubai, NewYork, Paris, Singapore, Hong Kong and Johannesburg. It is said about him that he has combined future with past in the present. His pioneering and innovative designs guarantee that the majestic epoch of regal India will remain in power even in the present!
Growing up, Lauren was encouraged by his mother to become a rabbi, but he chose a much different course. Influenced by the easy, preppy elegance of the country club set, as well as the glamour of old Hollywood, he chose to emulate the work of Brooks Brothers and other WASP-y retailers, creating a look that seemed to embody easy American elegance. His interest in luxury, refinement and a certain “taste level” put a different spin on the staid classics of the past.
Edited's data plays into the trend too. The analysts saw a rise in ultra-feminine themes with floral patterns being particularly key. Out of the total floral-print offering, 40% of the items were dresses in both the UK and the U.S. Some of our personal favourites? Paco Rabanne (especially when paired with a cute cardigan), Prada (so many different, weird and wonderful takes on a very classic idea) and Richard Quinn (literally every editor cried at his show because the jaw-dropping dresses combined with live music from Freya Ridings was just too much beauty to handle).
If sequins aren't your thing, add a bit of zhush to your look with playful textures. I.e. extreme fluff. To go full-feather, you'll need to forgo any concerns for a sleek silhouette and embrace the bulk. Pair an OTT coat atop a chic slip for an impactful moment you can take off once inside, or go full-throttle with a feathered dress for drama all night long.
Ralph Lauren is worth $7.5 billion, and he got it all because of his fashion sense. In 1970, the first Polo logo was seen in Lauren’s line of women’s suits that was designed in the classic men’s style. Two years later, the famous short sleeve shirt with the Polo emblem appeared, and it soon became a classic. These shirts have been collected by men all over the world ever since. Lauren, on the other hand, has been collecting rare and classic cars. The collection is so unique that it has been featured in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

Long vests, which the planners have been playing around with for a couple of seasons now, are perfect for the pre-fall season, particularly in light of the way that pre-fall is the season for outerwear that you have been so amped up for. A possibility for the 70’s jackets and overcoats, long vests have a diminishing effect on the body, especially when left detached. They can be worn in the pre-fall September isolated, displaying the revealed arms, with sweater when it gets colder, or even used for a layered look.
A pattern maker (also referred as pattern master or pattern cutter) drafts the shapes and sizes of a garment's pieces. This may be done manually with paper and measuring tools or by using a CAD computer software program. Another method is to drape fabric directly onto a dress form. The resulting pattern pieces can be constructed to produce the intended design of the garment and required size. Formal training is usually required for working as a pattern marker.
The Spanish fashion designer Cristobal Balenciaga was born on January 21 in 1895. After studying dressmaking as a child, by age 20, Cristobal started his own brand and became Spanish’s leading couturier. In 1937, he moved to Paris due to the Spanish Civil War. Balenciaga’s designs are famous by its capes, flowing clothes without waistlines, as well as the use of plastic for rainwear. Cristobal died in 1972 in Valencia, Spain.
In the City of Light, during the years from 1927 to 1940, Schiaparelli’s reputation for daring designs grew steadily. Soon, Parisians developed a passion for her unusual dresses, sweaters, and accessories. Her signature style always encompassed some whimsical elements, such as lobster motifs or skeleton ribs and bones (made with trapunto quilting); however, the construction of the garments themselves was often quite strict and tailored…this dichotomy made for original pieces that were often “knocked off” by other designers.
After working for renowned fashion house Nino Cerruti, he branched out on his own, delivering his first women’s wear collection in 1974. Armani’s designs were always influenced by menswear, and his immaculate tailoring and cutting gave his pieces a timeless air. He is famous for his deconstructed jackets, which feature a softer shoulder and a longer line.

Half-way garments are an alternative to ready-to-wear, "off-the-peg", or prêt-à-porter fashion. Half-way garments are intentionally unfinished pieces of clothing that encourages co-design between the "primary designer" of the garment, and what would usually be considered, the passive "consumer"[5]. This differs from ready-to-wear fashion, as the consumer is able to participate in the process of making and co-designing their clothing. During the Make{able} workshop, Hirscher and Niinimaki found that personal involvement in the garment-making process created a meaningful “narrative” for the user, which established a person-product attachment and increased the sentimental value of the final product.[5]
If there's one styling trick that was put on the map at the tail end of 2018 and looks set to continue well into this winter, it's the idea of the double jumper, or scrumper, as we called it (because it's essentially about tying another jumper around your neck as a scarf). The concept has extended even further since then, with many designer using super-cosy knits from head to toe. The chicest and easiest way to do it is with the same colour or pattern.

In addition to bovver boots, a treasure trove of key pieces to plunder awaits you: Some you may own already (dig out that camel sweater), but a few entirely new-looking items will probably be worth the hype (that JW Anderson trench coat is going to sell out so fast). We chart those below, as well as all of the teeny-tiny details that make a difference, like a choker necklace—they're back—as well as the most of-the-moment colours, prints, fabrics, silhouettes, formulas and overarching themes that make up autumn/winter 2019's top trends. From dark floral dresses (Paco Rabanne wins) to the kind of tights every fashion girl will wear when the centigrade drops (with crystals on, please), here's what's what for autumn.
The people who prefer this are the ones who require everything at best quality. Nothing satisfies them if it is not worth the trouble. They often look for styles that make a statement on the quality, polished manner and culture. Most of them are the ones who are from higher status and are also in a way related to how a businesswoman would dress up. Sophisticated can be characterized as businesswoman minus the formal look. Culture and luxury mean the most to the people who choose this style of fashion.
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