In fact, Schiaparelli’s designs were often all too simple to copy, unlike the work of her chief rival, Coco Chanel. After World War II, Schiaparelli, who had lived in New York during the war, returned to Paris and found a different sensibility among its people. The post-war desire for simplicity and practicality made the unique embellishments of her designs less popular, and the endless knock-offs also cut into her profits.
As an extension of the above furry trend, it was plain to see across the runways in each and every fashion capital that feathers were the detail of the moment. Either used for bonkers accessories or dotted onto the finest of silk-chiffon blouses to make them quiver ever so, this trend spans from clothes to accessories and back again. You'll see the high street adopting it for party season and in the shoe department.
Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.
I don't think I've ever seen so many trends! The autumn/winter 2019 fashions are, to say the least, varied, vast and very much going to suit your style, whatever that may be. If you're a minimalist, there's much to love. If you're a maximalist, this is an epic time for you too. If you like colour, great. If you hate colour, fabulous! Want to dress like you're permanently at a party? That's an entirely legitimate planned, backed by many big industry hitters, including Marc Jacobs and Versace.
Known as the prince of Prints, the fashion designer Emilio Pucci got known for his tight shantung “Pucci pants” and vividly printed silk dresses and blouses. His colorful, informal uniforms for Braniff flight attendants were groundbreaking. Later, Pucci branched into men’s fashions, perfume, and ceramics. He also served as a member of the Italian Parliament. His color trends and designs are one of KOKET’s most lovable inspirations.
Fashion designers work in different ways. Some sketch their ideas on paper, while others drape fabric on a dress form. When a designer is completely satisfied with the fit of the toile (or muslin), he or she will consult a professional pattern maker who then makes the finished, working version of the pattern out of card or via a computerized system. Finally, a sample garment is made up and tested on a model to make sure it is an operational outfit.
Christian Lacroix directs his devotion and talent for fantasy and theatrics to create true design spectacles. Lacroix arrived in the 80s with the opening of his fashion house and immediately set the world on fire with unexpected mixes of colors and patterns. “The idea of seeing everybody clad the same is not really my cup of tea“. This is one of the best quotes of Lacroix, fighting for unique and irreverent pieces in the world of fashion.
Fashion. Fashion is completely transparent. It’s fun, it’s confusing, and it never dies off. Fashions from the past are still being worn by women across the country and new fashions are being designed every day. There’s SO many different fashion styles, and we’ve come up with a list of the top 20 looks, from elegant to gothic, exotic to casual, and everything in between.
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