Designers conduct research on fashion trends and interpret them for their audience. Their specific designs are used by manufacturers. This is the essence of a designer’s role; however, there is variation within this that is determined by the buying and merchandising approach, and product quality; for example, budget retailers will use inexpensive fabrics to interpret trends, but high-end retailers will ensure that the best available fabrics are used.[1]
Being way more than a famous shoe designer, Manolo Blahnik is the man who can single-handedly make a woman feel instantly sexy with his ultra sophisticated, wildly fun high heel shoes. Becoming a household name through shows like Sex and the City and his never ending list of celebrity endorsements, Manolo Blahnik has become one of the most influential shoe designers of our time. Unfortunately it is known in fashion circles that when Blahnik dies there will be no more Manolos. There is no protégé or heir and no desire from the great designer to have the label continue without him.
It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images were shown to clients, which was much cheaper than producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked their design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.

Intelligent and pragmatic, Chanel used her powers of seduction to gain a foothold in the competitive fashion world; in succession, she became the mistress of two powerful and wealthy men. Both of her lovers were quite happy to use their money and influence to give her a start in business. From a beginning as a milliner, she rose to prominence in 1920, when her signature fragrance, the incredibly iconic Chanel No. 5, was launched.
Purple isn't for everyone, but it certainly made a bold splash across the runways of A/W 19. Major names stood behind the regal hue, including Dries Van Noten and Comme des Garçons. Many of the purple-centric outfits you'll come across featuring a spectrum head from to toe, with different shades thrown in for good measure—but IRL, we predict this shade will become more of an accent to darker winter wardrobes, so feel free to translate this into your own closet alongside black, white, navy and brown.
Famous Italian fashion brands include Gucci, Armani, Prada, Dolce & Gabbana, Valentino, Bottega Veneta, Roberto Cavalli, Costume National, Brunello Cucinelli, Diesel, Etro, Fay, Fendi, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fiorucci, Genny, Iceberg, Kiton, La Perla, Loro Piana, Marni, Missoni, Moncler, Moschino, Richmond, Ermanno Scervino, Tod's, Trussardi, and Versace.
A-line has been administering the design world for quite a while, and it is certainly on the ascent, particularly for the resort season. It looks best when brandished with a touch of the 70s for somewhat of a bend. A fun loving blend of manly coats with modernized flower prints or beautiful crisscrosses, trimmed cuts, and high-waisted flared fits or straight-leg pants worn with mentors, can leave no uncertainty. A-line jumpsuits, and dresses, or skirts with weaving, matched with shirts or sews, are ladylike, thus 2019!
"Between tonal dressing and statement knitwear, head-to-toe knits have been brought to the forefront. I appreciate the cosy yet chic approach to cold-weather dressing," says Aiken, who happens to the one of the first industry figures spotted in this trend all those months ago. "Gabriela Hearst’s knit poncho paired over a matching skirt and sweater best exemplifies this look."
In 1995, Rodriguez became design director of TSE, where he presented the first ready-to-wear collections for men and women. In 1996, Carolyn Bessette asked Rodriguez to create the gown she wore to marry John F. Kennedy Jr, putting the designer firmly on the fashion radar. Rodriguez was soon appointed design director of Cerruti in Paris. After that a consequence, Loewe appointed Rodriguez as design director of the women’s ready to wear collection. Rodriguez held the position until 2001.
Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel revolutionized the contemporary women’s clothing. Her bold fashion designs freed women from the constrained, time limited trends. Chanel suits have become style icons, as well as her Chanel bags. It was ‘Coco’ who has created the innovative concept of “little black dress”, without which it can not do any one woman. There is no doubt that Coco Chanel is one of the top fashion designers of clothing of all time!
The opposite to butter yellow, yet just as popular, neon segues from summer 2019 well into autumn and winter, coming up in surprising combinations: Who knew flouro green could work so well with brown? Or that highlighter yellow was friends with dark denim? Either way, you've had more than ample time in 2019 already to get used to the idea, so don't go packing away your summer brights when the colder weather comes.

Known as the champion of star-spangled glamour, Tommy Hilfieger‘s favorite trends go from red, white and blue. Since introducing his first collection in 1985, no designer has become more closely associated with Ivy League prep than Tommy Hilfiger. After building his company on the modernization of all-American men’s wear, and winning the CFDA Menswear Designer of the Year award in 1995, Hilfiger introduced women’s wear in 1996 and sold the company for $1.6 billion ten years later.


Giorgio Armani, an outstanding Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $7 billion as of 2012. Armani is also the first ever designer to ban models who has a Body Mass Index under 18. He is truly a living legend and a great fashion designer.
A vibrant fashion style is reserved for the lady who wants to say “Hey, look at ME, world!” This energetic and intense fashion style typically features garments with wild patterns and exaggerated embroidery as well as asymmetrical designs and tons of colors. Most of her wardrobe will be lined with super light and pastel colors that draw the attention of everyone’s eyes, no matter where it’s worn.
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