Arty as the names suggest, invokes the independent creativity of the person. These are usually the ones who want to make a statement of their own by the clothes they wear. Most of the times, they are the creators of their own fashion style. They do not follow the traditional norms and make the path for themselves. The unconventional for of art leads to innovating very many interesting forms of trends which are not restricted by the usual textbook nature of creating fashion.
If there could be such a thing as Big Dress Energy, the A/W 19 runways were absolutely chock-full of it. Avant garde eveningwear has become a focus for many brands, both those known for their elaborate after-dark looks (say, Rodarte) and those who are usually more casual (Y/Project). It's all about volume, drama, embellishment, rich colours, and as much satin and tulle as you can get your hands on. Sure, the hyped-up and hugely Instagrammable frilled dress explosions created by Tomo Koizumo won't literally slide effortlessly into your wardrobe, but the mantra of more is more will definitely influence the party season. 
One of our favorite italian fashion designers, Miuccia Prada was once a member of the Italian Communist Party and a mime student. She was an unlikely entrepreneur when she took over her family’s luggage business in 1978. She first dazzled the fashion world in 1985 with a series of black nylon handbags and backpacks. Prada is now a billion-dollar company. Beginning with Prada’s first ready-to-wear collection in 1989, she established a techno minimalism based on pared-down design, innovative fabrics, and computer-enhanced patterns that have become influentially iconic.
Known as the prince of Prints, the fashion designer Emilio Pucci got known for his tight shantung “Pucci pants” and vividly printed silk dresses and blouses. His colorful, informal uniforms for Braniff flight attendants were groundbreaking. Later, Pucci branched into men’s fashions, perfume, and ceramics. He also served as a member of the Italian Parliament. His color trends and designs are one of KOKET’s most lovable inspirations.
Another India’s old hand and expert designer, from New-Delhi and designs both for men and women! His outfits are worn by Bollywood-actresses and has been in the field since 1980’s. He was given a title of “India’s-Master-Of-Fabric-And-Fantasy”, in 1996 by Time magazine. He has quite perfect sense of creativity & each of his invention is crafed to excellence. He did his graduation from St. Stephen College of NewDelhi with a first class(hons.) degree in history and created his first traditional line for men back in 1990. His client celebrities include Pamela Anderson, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Cambell, Anna Koirnikova nd Uma Thurman and most of his fashion-shows are done in Singapore, NewYork, India and Paris and also is the brand-ambassador of Omega-watches since 2001.
In fact, Schiaparelli’s designs were often all too simple to copy, unlike the work of her chief rival, Coco Chanel. After World War II, Schiaparelli, who had lived in New York during the war, returned to Paris and found a different sensibility among its people. The post-war desire for simplicity and practicality made the unique embellishments of her designs less popular, and the endless knock-offs also cut into her profits.
Fashion designers work in different ways. Some sketch their ideas on paper, while others drape fabric on a dress form. When a designer is completely satisfied with the fit of the toile (or muslin), he or she will consult a professional pattern maker who then makes the finished, working version of the pattern out of card or via a computerized system. Finally, a sample garment is made up and tested on a model to make sure it is an operational outfit.
In this stage fabric properties like its weight, tenacity, and construction are determined. Now-a-days fabrics are becoming smarter. For the textile development there are new terms are used such as, high performances, technical, intelligent and smart fabric. Some designers select these kinds of fabrics to show their creativity and present it on fashion show.

"We saw the 'army' mood return, but in a more effortless and understated way than previous seasons. A utility and combat mood was a favorite in Milan, particularly from the likes of Prada and Miu Miu, who offered full army-inspired looks. I loved Isabel Marant’s oversized styles which similarly drew inspiration with oversized vests and pocket-detailed trousers. A favourite piece had to be Stella McCartney's full khaki green jumpsuit, which looks great with an oversized jacket in the same hue and a pair of pumps," says Hsu.

Fashion designer Jimmy Choo was born in Penang, Malaysia in 1961. He used the craftsmanship he learned from his father, also a cobbler, to create some of the most coveted shoes in the world. Choo opened his first shop in Hackney in 1986 in an old hospital building. Within two years of opening his shop, Choo’s shoes were featured in an eight-page spread in Vogue magazine. Soon, Choo became the darling of the celebrity world, in particular Princess Diana, who donned Choo’s footwear seemingly everywhere she went. Jimmy Choo rose to fame for the quality and style of his handmade women’s shoes.
An homage to Karl Lagerfeld or just a coincidence, bouclé and tweeds are back on the fashion menu and looking particularly natty in jacket form. It's a trend we know the high street does well (Zara are particularly skilled in this department), so I'd imagine this will become available at a lower price point and may take the place of your parka/biker/bombers when it comes to flinging a jacket over any given outfit. You could go the whole nine yards and wear it with a matching skirt (see Gucci) or dress (Brock Collection), but we also liked Louis Vuitton's leather trousers idea. 

He rebounded in the 60’s and 70’s, designing his own line and stunning Paris and the entire fashion world with his own brand of French elegance. However, the stress of his work led him to abuse booze and drugs; in time, the fragile designer’s health became precarious. By 1987, he was unable to fulfill his responsibilities, and allowed others to design his prêt-a-porter line.

When you hear ‘casual’, you probably think ‘frumpy’; and the casual fashion style could really be ANYTHING but frumpy! Women who indulge in the casual fashion style don’t grab the exotic and bold items off the shelves. They would much rather prefer a simple white tee and a pair of black pants with a coordinating and trendy purse. The entire look is very modern and uncluttered with an extra touch of subtle elegance.

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