In addition to bovver boots, a treasure trove of key pieces to plunder awaits you: Some you may own already (dig out that camel sweater), but a few entirely new-looking items will probably be worth the hype (that JW Anderson trench coat is going to sell out so fast). We chart those below, as well as all of the teeny-tiny details that make a difference, like a choker necklace—they're back—as well as the most of-the-moment colours, prints, fabrics, silhouettes, formulas and overarching themes that make up autumn/winter 2019's top trends. From dark floral dresses (Paco Rabanne wins) to the kind of tights every fashion girl will wear when the centigrade drops (with crystals on, please), here's what's what for autumn.

If there could be such a thing as Big Dress Energy, the A/W 19 runways were absolutely chock-full of it. Avant garde eveningwear has become a focus for many brands, both those known for their elaborate after-dark looks (say, Rodarte) and those who are usually more casual (Y/Project). It's all about volume, drama, embellishment, rich colours, and as much satin and tulle as you can get your hands on. Sure, the hyped-up and hugely Instagrammable frilled dress explosions created by Tomo Koizumo won't literally slide effortlessly into your wardrobe, but the mantra of more is more will definitely influence the party season. 
Valentino Garavani, better known as Valentino, was born in northern Italy in 1932. From childhood, he was interested in fashion, and he pursued apprenticeships and training from family and local designers. By his late teens, he was ready for Paris. His parents helped him to move there, and when he arrived, he began to study art and design in preparation for his chosen career.
Ralph  joined the fashion industry as a tie seller. He tried to introduce his own tie designs for the company, but his enthusiasm wasn’t perceived well. So, he left the company and launched his own mini-business: he sewed his first ties out of rags and distributed them to small shops. The most defining order of 100 dozens of ties by Neiman Marcus has radically changed Ralph’s life. He expanded his business by introducing menswear and womenswear lines. Currently his brand is worth $7.5 billion. Ralph Lauren’s success story inspires many novice designers. The first Polo logo was introduced in 1970.
"A/W is always a moment for incredible outerwear, and this season it was no exception. For the most part, it was the bigger the better; oversized shapes, duvet dressing, blanket capes and more," says Elizabeth von der Goltz, Net-a-Porter global buying director. "Oversized cannot be mentioned without talking to the trench coat and the bigger the better with billowing sleeves at JW Anderson, cape draping at Burberry and classic maxi coats at Khaite. Big coats marked the opening of the Max Mara runway in blue, yellow and teal. Hot pink was the favourite at Jacquemus and Valentino, whose oversized silhouettes gave this typically feminine colour a masculine twist. And last but not least is the puffa jacket, which received an elegant update with a new reference to duvet dressing. Padding, quilting, floral embroidery and organza layering came from the likes of Margiela, Dries Van Noten and Toteme."
Gabrielle“Coco” Bonheur Chanel is probably the most reputable fashion designer of all time. She is a very exceptional, hard-working woman who has managed to found the famous Chanel brand. The key things she tries to convey in her designs are simplicity, practicality and elegance. Coco is one of the most influential figure of the 20th century. Her ideas are very modernistic and brave, and her models are still the benchmark in simplicity and elegance.
Known as the champion of star-spangled glamour, Tommy Hilfieger‘s favorite trends go from red, white and blue. Since introducing his first collection in 1985, no designer has become more closely associated with Ivy League prep than Tommy Hilfiger. After building his company on the modernization of all-American men’s wear, and winning the CFDA Menswear Designer of the Year award in 1995, Hilfiger introduced women’s wear in 1996 and sold the company for $1.6 billion ten years later.
When you hear ‘casual’, you probably think ‘frumpy’; and the casual fashion style could really be ANYTHING but frumpy! Women who indulge in the casual fashion style don’t grab the exotic and bold items off the shelves. They would much rather prefer a simple white tee and a pair of black pants with a coordinating and trendy purse. The entire look is very modern and uncluttered with an extra touch of subtle elegance.
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